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Norse Group Flags by 1Wyrmshadow1 Norse Group Flags by 1Wyrmshadow1
[link]

I can't believe I did all this in one night. I tried my best to keep everything in a single theme. Gods/giants use the Nordic flag. Animals (basically wolves) I used the flag pattern of St. Louis. I did my best to reasearch themes and colors for each one. There was little information I could glean, but what there is, I compiled below so you can understand my reasoning too. If it was possible, I added runes to match the character of the god, like Fire, ancestor, mother etc etc.

There are still 8 unnamed/unconfirmed moons in this group.
I have since given those moons names and flags just in case.


Skathi (Skathi subgroup)(Skadi) is a jötunn and goddess associated with bowhunting, skiing, winter, and mountains.

S/2007 S 2

Skoll (Skathi subgroup) is a wolf that chases the horses Árvakr and Alsviđr, that drag the chariot which contains the sun (Sól) through the sky every day, trying to eat her. Sköll has a brother, Hati, who chases Máni, the moon. At Ragnarök, both Sköll and Hati will succeed in their quests.

Greip In Norse mythology, Gjálp and Greip are two giantesses. "Then Thor saw Gjálp, daughter of Geirröđr, standing in certain ravines, one leg in each , spanning the river, and she was causing the spate. Then Thor snatched up a great stone out of the river and cast it at her, saying these words: 'At its source should a river be stemmed.' Nor did he miss that at which he threw."

Hyrrokkin (Skathi subgroup) n Norse mythology, Hyrrokkin ("Fire-Smoked", possibly referring to a dark, shrivelled appearance[1]) is a giantess.

S/2004 S 13

S/2004 S 17

Jarnsaxa In Norse mythology, Járnsaxa ( /j?rn'sćks?/; Old Norse "iron-sax")[1] is a jötunn. According to Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda, she was Thor's lover. By him she was the mother of Magni. According to the Poetic Edda poem Hyndluljóđ, Járnsaxa is the name of one of the Nine Mothers of Heimdallr.

Mundilfari In Norse mythology Mundilfari or Mundilfäri (Old Norse, possibly "the one moving according to particular times"[1]) is the father of Sól, associated with the Sun, and Máni, associated with the Moon. Mundilfari is attested in the Poetic Edda poem Vafţrúđnismál stanza 23, and in chapter 11 of the Prose Edda book Gylfaginning. Mundilfari, a natural satellite of the planet Saturn, is named after the figure.

S/2006 S 1 (Skathi subgroup)

Narvi (Narvi subgroup) Narfi in Norse mythology may refer to the son of Loki or the father of Nótt, the personified night. n the Prose Edda book Gylfaginning, Narfi, also known as Nari or Narvi, is a son of Loki and Sigyn who is killed to punish Loki for his crimes. The gods turned his brother Váli into a slavering wolf who tears Narfi's throat out. His entrails are then used to bind Loki to a stone slab until Ragnarök.
However, in the Poetic Edda book Lokasenna, the guts of Nari are used to bind Loki while Narfi is turned into a wolf. Thus it is not generally clear to scholars whether Nari and Narfi are the same, or if Vali is another name for Nari or Narfi.


Bergelmir (Skathi subgroup) "Mountain Yeller" or "Bear Yeller")[1] is a frost giant, the son of giant Ţrúđgelmir and the grandson of Ymir (who was called Aurgelmir among giants), the first frost giant, according to stanza 29 of the poem Vafthrudnismal from the Poetic Edda:

Suttungr In Norse mythology, Suttungr was a Jötunn, a son of Gilling, who (along with Suttungr's mother) had been murdered by Fjalar and Galar.Suttungr searched for his parents and threatened the dwarven brothers (Fjalar and Galar), tying them and some other dwarves who killed Gilling to a rock that would be submerged by the rising tide. The dwarves begged for Suttungr to spare their life and offered him the magical mead of poetry. Suttungr took it and hid it in the center of a mountain, with his daughter, Gunnlöđ, standing guard whom he turned into a witch in order to guard it.
Odin eventually decided to obtain the mead. He worked for Baugi, Suttungr's brother, a farmer, for an entire summer, then asked for a small sip of the mead. Baugi drilled into the mountain and Odin changed into a snake and slithered inside. Inside, Gunnlod was on guard but he persuaded her to give him three sips in exchange for three nights of sex. Odin proceeded to drink all the mead, changed into an eagle and escaped. Suttungr chased him.[1]


S/2004 S 12

S/2004 S 7

Hati In Norse mythology, Hati Hróđvitnisson (first name meaning "He Who Hates, Enemy"[1]) is a wolf that according to Gylfaginning chases the Moon across the night sky, just as the wolf Sköll chases the Sun during the day, until the time of Ragnarök when they will swallow these heavenly bodies, after which Fenrir will break free from his bonds and kill Odin.

Bestla (Narvi subgroup) In Norse mythology, Bestla is the mother of the gods Odin, Vili and Vé by way of Borr, the sister of an unnamed being who assisted Odin, and the daughter or, depending on source, granddaughter of the jötunn Bölţorn. Bestla is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson, and in the poetry of skalds. Some scholars have theorized that Bestla's unnamed brother is Mímir.

Farbauti (Skathi subgroup) In Norse mythology, Fárbauti (Old Norse: "cruel striker") is the jötunn husband of Laufey or Nál and the father of Loki, and possibly also of Helblindi and Byleistr. He is attested in the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson, and in the poetry of Viking Age skalds. Fárbauti's name and character are thought to have been inspired by the observation of the natural phenomena surrounding the appearance of wildfire.
In the Prose Edda book Gylfaginning, the enthroned figure of High says Loki is the son of the jötunn Fárbauti and that "Laufey or Nál is his mother".[1] In Skáldskaparmál, Fárbauti receives another three mentions. In chapter 16, Lokakenningar or "ways of referring to Loki" are provided, one of which reads "son of Fárbauti and Laufey, or Nál".[2] In chapter 17, a work by the 10th century skald Úlfr Uggason is quoted referring to Loki as "Fárbauti's terribly sly son".[3] In chapter 22, Fárbauti is referenced in the Haustlöng of 10th century skald Ţjóđólfr of Hvinir, where Loki is referred to as "Fárbauti's son".[4]

Thrymr In Norse mythology, Ţrymr (Thrymr, Thrym; "uproar") was king of the jotnar. In one legend, he stole Mjollnir, Thor's hammer, to extort the gods into giving him Freyja as his wife. His kingdom was called Jötunheimr, but according to Hversu Noregr byggdist, it was the Swedish province Värmland, then a part of Norway.
Ţrymr was foiled in his scheme by the knowledge of Heimdall, the cunning of Loki, and the sheer violence of Thor. Thor, son of Odin, later killed Thrym, his sister, and all of his jotnar kin, which had been present at the wedding reception. The poem Ţrymskviđa gives the details of how Thor got his hammer back. Bergfinnr is a son of Thrymr, the Giant of Vermland.

S/2007 S 3

Aegir Ćgir (Old Norse "sea"[1]) is a sea giant, god of the ocean and king of the sea creatures in Norse mythology. He is also known for hosting elaborate parties for the gods.

S/2006 S 3 (Skathi subgroup)

Kari (Skathi subgroup) Fornjót (Old Norse Fornjótr) was an ancient giant in Norse mythology and a king of Finland. His children are Ćgir (the ruler of the sea), Logi (fire giant) and Kári (god of wind).
The name has often been interpreted[1] as forn-jótr "ancient giant", and Karl Simrock (1869) because of this identified Formjotr with the primeval giant Ymir. But it is also possible, as was suggested by Müller (1818),[2] that it is one of a well-established group of names or titles of gods in -njótr "user, owner, possessor", which would make Fornjótr the "original owner" (primus occupans vel utens) of Norway.

Fenrir s a monstrous wolf. Fenrir is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda and Heimskringla, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. In both the Poetic Edda and Prose Edda, Fenrir is the father of the wolves Sköll and Hati Hróđvitnisson, is a son of Loki, and is foretold to kill the god Odin during the events of Ragnarök, but will in turn be killed by Odin's son Víđarr.
In the Prose Edda, additional information is given about Fenrir, including that, due to the gods' knowledge of prophecies foretelling great trouble from Fenrir and his rapid growth, the gods bound him, and as a result Fenrir bit off the right hand of the god Týr. Depictions of Fenrir have been identified on various objects, and scholarly theories have been proposed regarding Fenrir's relation to other canine beings in Norse mythology. Fenrir has been the subject of artistic depictions, and he appears in literature.

Surtur In Norse mythology, Surtr or Surt (Old Norse "black"[1] or "the swarthy one"[2]) is an eldjötunn. Surtr is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. In both sources, Surtr is foretold as being a major figure during the events of Ragnarök; carrying his bright sword, he will go to battle against the Ćsir, he will do battle with the major god Freyr, and afterward the flames that he brings forth will engulf the Earth.
In a poem from the Poetic Edda, Surtr is described as having a female companion, Sinmara. In a book from the Prose Edda additional information is given about Surtr, including that he is stationed guarding the frontier of the fiery realm Múspell, that he will lead "Múspell's sons" to Ragnarök, and that he will defeat Freyr. Surtr has been the subject of place names and artistic depictions, and scholarly theories have been proposed about elements of Surtr's descriptions and his potential origins.

Ymir In Norse mythology, Ymir, also called Aurgelmir (Old Norse gravel-yeller) among the giants themselves, was the founder of the race of frost giants and was later killed by the Borrs.

Loge In Norse mythology, Logi or Loge (Old Norse "fire") is a fire giant, god and personification of fire. He is son of giant Fornjótr and brother of Ćgir (sea giant) and Kári (god of the wind). Logi married fire giantess Glöđ and she bore him two beautiful daughters - Eisa and Eimirya.

Fornjót (Old Norse Fornjótr) was an ancient giant in Norse mythology and a king of Finland. His children are Ćgir (the ruler of the sea), Logi (fire giant) and Kári (god of wind).
The name has often been interpreted[1] as forn-jótr "ancient giant", and Karl Simrock (1869) because of this identified Formjotr with the primeval giant Ymir. But it is also possible, as was suggested by Müller (1818),[2] that it is one of a well-established group of names or titles of gods in -njótr "user, owner, possessor", which would make Fornjótr the "original owner" (primus occupans vel utens) of Norway.
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:iconluckmann:
Luckmann Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2012
Some of them are perhaps a bit "crowded", but overall, very nice work.
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:icon1wyrmshadow1:
1Wyrmshadow1 Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2012
I'm sorry you feel that way but since most of these are tiny rocks the size of cities.... city flags tend to be more unconventional.
Reply
:iconluckmann:
Luckmann Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2012
Very true. In Sweden, all municipalities now have their own coat of arms thing, even those that traditionally didn't. Most of these are from the 70's and 80's.

Yeah.

Unconventional.

"It's a river! And a mountain! Side by side!"
"And then what'd you smoke?"
Reply
:iconplutoth:
PlutoTH Featured By Owner Aug 7, 2011  Student Digital Artist
The colours!
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:iconromaniatricolor:
RomaniaTricolor Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2011
Cool, updates! :D
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:icontriffraff:
TriffRaff Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2011
You've got to respect a race/nation that puts a silhouette of a babe on their flag!

...That, and the silhouette of a skier...
Reply
:iconkyuzoaoi:
kyuzoaoi Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2011  Student Artist
Definitely.
Reply
:iconfenn-o-manic:
Fenn-O-maniC Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
So great! This art is going to my 'More than Fave' folder!
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